leaders

Why action plans are overrated?

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In this article, Jeroen de Flander explains how strategy execution is helping people make small choices in line with a big choice. The idea is to change the way we look at strategy execution; that as leaders we should imagine a decision tree instead of an action plan. Don´t waste time asking people for action plans, but help them make better decisions.

Then, he talks about The Mintzberg Pattern, when all small choices in your execution journey are in line with the big choice. And ends with an experiment made by a high school student Britney Gallivan of Pomona, California where if you fold a piece of paper in half 50 times, how thick would the end result be? She decided to test it and in the end, she was able to fold the paper 12 times and also to explain the phenomenal exponential force of repetitive small actions!!!

So, successful strategists have SMALL decisions on their radar. Are your SMALL choices in line with the BIG choice?

Read the article here: https://madmimi.com/p/c524d4?fe=1&pact=22551778446

5 Articles On Strategy From 2013 Worth Reading

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The fourth article from 2013 brings a more robust and interlinked process of strategy planning and strategy execution. We hope that you will find value in each of these article choices.  Here comes the fourth one:

The Interdependence of Strategy and Execution in a Rapidly Changing World

Summary:

Through his article, Rod Collins from US based Optimity Advisors, comments on the commonly perceived duality of a successful strategy; planning and execution. While these two fundamental principles have traditionally been assigned under different accountabilities in 20th century organizations, for the fast paced world of the 21st century these two have moved towards becoming – as they should – unified under the same accountabilities.

The reason for this change has been the radical transformation of the landscape in which organizations operate, propelled by the advent of internet usage in a much more personal way. The resulting information revolution has shifted the power in what drives organizational strategies more towards the requirements and needs of customers, rather than the organization’s product agenda.

Consequently, a more robust and interlinked process of strategy planning and strategy execution is required, where each helps to shape the other.

Indeed, those responsible for executing strategies have a closer finger on the pulse of the customers, and the needs that will shape their strategy. This crucial insight from the executors is what’s needed in defining and planning modern strategies – just as leaders need to be closer to its execution.

 Our question:

Who should be involved in the strategy definition process?

Readhttp://blog.optimityadvisors.com/?p=259

5 Articles On Strategy From 2013 Worth Reading

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The second article from 2013 brings an emotional approach to strategy execution.

We hope that you will find value in each of these article choices. Here comes the second one:

An Emotional Approach to Strategy Execution

Summary:

 This article talks about collective emotions and how leaders should deal with this. At INSEAD´s strategy execution program they teach executives “emotional capital” skills. They think that leaders, who are able to identify and manage patterns of emotions in a collective, are better able to make their ambitious strategies a reality.

As research in neurology and psychology has shown, emotions can influence human thinking and behaviors in powerful ways and impact performance in organizations. Studies show that emotions that are driven underground tend to incubate and surface later.

To manage collective emotions you first have to understand their nature and differentiate collective emotions from personal emotions, then actively encourage the expression of emotions and their causes at work – in a climate of relative psychological safety.  So, taking appropriate emotion management action is a key role for executives who want to successfully make strategy execution happen.

Their conclusion is that leaders will have greater chance of identifying and channeling negative emotions toward constructive ends by perceiving the patterns of emotions in their organizations.

 And our question is:

Can we create a more practical way to assess real live emotions rather than “after the fact” surveys and assessments? 

Read: http://knowledge.insead.edu/strategy/an-emotional-approach-to-strategy-execution-3057