Month: March 2014

5 Articles On Strategy From 2013 Worth Reading

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The fifth and last article from 2013 brings “a culture that throws out the misconception of strategy planning and execution as two different things”. We hope you found value in each of these article choices and let us know your thoughts related to these topics. Please go to the article, to leave a comment.

Closing the Chasm between Strategy and Execution

Summary:

The chasm between strategy and execution is one that has typically come about due to the traditional segregation between those with the big ideas who come up with the plans, and those on the ground who experience the real world. Leadership and strategy consultant, Doug Sundheim, proposes in his article some solutions for what can help bridge the divide between the strategists and executors based on his extensive experience.

While some easy solutions can help to narrow this gap, mostly through better process alignment, a better and more powerful solution would be to address the problem at its root; by embodying a culture that throws out the misconception of strategy planning and execution as two different things.

With this common sense solution in mind, and through their belief in a core set of principles, both the best strategists and the best executors meet in a middle ground, where each recognizes at the core that they are willing to take responsibility for a task, even if its “not-given” and isn’t directly their responsibility.

Our question is:

How should strategy planners get involved in the execution of strategy?

Read: http://blogs.hbr.org/2013/08/closing-the-chasm-between-strategy-and-ex

5 Articles On Strategy From 2013 Worth Reading

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The fourth article from 2013 brings a more robust and interlinked process of strategy planning and strategy execution. We hope that you will find value in each of these article choices.  Here comes the fourth one:

The Interdependence of Strategy and Execution in a Rapidly Changing World

Summary:

Through his article, Rod Collins from US based Optimity Advisors, comments on the commonly perceived duality of a successful strategy; planning and execution. While these two fundamental principles have traditionally been assigned under different accountabilities in 20th century organizations, for the fast paced world of the 21st century these two have moved towards becoming – as they should – unified under the same accountabilities.

The reason for this change has been the radical transformation of the landscape in which organizations operate, propelled by the advent of internet usage in a much more personal way. The resulting information revolution has shifted the power in what drives organizational strategies more towards the requirements and needs of customers, rather than the organization’s product agenda.

Consequently, a more robust and interlinked process of strategy planning and strategy execution is required, where each helps to shape the other.

Indeed, those responsible for executing strategies have a closer finger on the pulse of the customers, and the needs that will shape their strategy. This crucial insight from the executors is what’s needed in defining and planning modern strategies – just as leaders need to be closer to its execution.

 Our question:

Who should be involved in the strategy definition process?

Readhttp://blog.optimityadvisors.com/?p=259

5 Articles On Strategy From 2013 Worth Reading

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The third article from 2013 brings an approach called “adaptive strategy”.

We hope that you will find value in each of these article choices. Here comes the third one:

The Strategic Plan is Dead. Long Live Strategy

Summary:

This article points to a better understanding of the history of strategy and the way to re-inventing strategy for the world we live in today.

The static strategic plan is dead as the future is no longer reasonably predictable based on the past; it is liable to be startlingly different. Good data is easy to access and cheap to acquire. Communication is rapid, indiscriminate and constant. So, the Monitor Institute has developed an approach called “adaptive strategy”, which is about “setting a direction and testing it”, treating the whole organization as a team that is experimenting its way to success.

A strategy process that ran from observe to orient, to decide and finally to act, returning immediately to further observation.

And our question is:

How often should a new strategy be formulated?

Read:  http://www.ssireview.org/blog/entry/the_strategic_plan_is_dead._long_live_strategy

5 Articles On Strategy From 2013 Worth Reading

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The second article from 2013 brings an emotional approach to strategy execution.

We hope that you will find value in each of these article choices. Here comes the second one:

An Emotional Approach to Strategy Execution

Summary:

 This article talks about collective emotions and how leaders should deal with this. At INSEAD´s strategy execution program they teach executives “emotional capital” skills. They think that leaders, who are able to identify and manage patterns of emotions in a collective, are better able to make their ambitious strategies a reality.

As research in neurology and psychology has shown, emotions can influence human thinking and behaviors in powerful ways and impact performance in organizations. Studies show that emotions that are driven underground tend to incubate and surface later.

To manage collective emotions you first have to understand their nature and differentiate collective emotions from personal emotions, then actively encourage the expression of emotions and their causes at work – in a climate of relative psychological safety.  So, taking appropriate emotion management action is a key role for executives who want to successfully make strategy execution happen.

Their conclusion is that leaders will have greater chance of identifying and channeling negative emotions toward constructive ends by perceiving the patterns of emotions in their organizations.

 And our question is:

Can we create a more practical way to assess real live emotions rather than “after the fact” surveys and assessments? 

Read: http://knowledge.insead.edu/strategy/an-emotional-approach-to-strategy-execution-3057

5 Articles On Strategy From 2013 Worth Reading

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Starting today you will be able to read, comment and share the 5 articles on Strategy from 2013, we think you should have read. Each of these articles explore different facets of strategy definition and execution, future trends and insights.

We hope that you will find value in each of these article choices. Here comes the first one:

The art of strategy

Summary:

In this article Chris Bradley and Angus Dawson from McKinsey explain how strategic thought has evolved and where it is headed. Today it is about “common math” applied to “common data” with “common wisdom”, but more analytical rigor has to be brought into strategy. It is important to realize that strategy is not just about what is written on paper, but about the thinking and feeling processes of the leaders of the company.

The strategy method they propose is to diagnose,forecast, search and finish the strategy.  To make change happen by designing a social process such that people can really deal with the big ideas and change their deeply held biases about what the company should do in the future.

The future trends they see regarding strategy are about being very analytical about resource allocation to differentiate high performance from low performance, particularly on stock-market returns, and about market selection to drive growth, which turns out to be much more important than to gain market share.

And we have some questions on this:

Is there only room for Analytics in the future of strategy? What about intuition?

Where does innovation fit in this methodology?

Read: http://www.mckinsey.com/Insights/Strategy/The_art_of_strategy?cid=strategy-eml-alt-mkq-mck-oth-1310

 

The X Model of Employee Engagement

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There are words in management that appear from time to time that most people tend to agree with and many times pursue. Concepts such as: customer loyalty, strategic alignment, value-added, process redesign, innovation and Employee Engagement, are considered “no brainers” that appear in most organizations’ strategies. However, many times when you dig deeper and ask people what those concepts mean to them, you hear all kinds of different definitions. This means that in theory people “agree” with the headline, “Customer Loyalty” for example, but not what it means in practical terms nor how to go about to actually obtain it!

This is the case with Employee Engagement. Everyone wants it, but no one can really describe it in an objective manner. This video contributes exactly in that way, in helping define in specific terms what  Employee Engagement really means!

Now that you have a clear definition, you are ready to face the really hard challenge, which is how to actually have people engaged with their work.  Good luck!!